Welcome to the Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board, an online wood carving forum community where you can join thousands of carvers from around the world discussing all things related to carving. To gain full access to the message board you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:
  • Browse over 90,000 posts.
  • Communicate privately with other carvers from around the world.
  • Post your own photos or view from 3,500 user submitted images.
  • Gain access to exclusive wood carving promotions offered by Wood Carving Illustrated and Fox Chapel Publishing.
All this and much more is available to you absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact the Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board's Support Team.

Go Back   Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board > Wood Carving > Wood Carving Tutorials
Connect with Facebook

OCC Tools
Wood Carving Tutorials

Reply
Share Thread:
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-13-2006, 02:18 AM
Scott
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 63
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Question How to make a Hook Knife, Part 1, 2 & 3

Part 1. Hook, crooked, bent knives, whatever you like to call them (they are the same depending on what part of the world your in), are an exceptionally versatile tool if made well. Carvers, craftspeople, and woodworkers of every stripe would benefit from having a good sturdy hook in their tool box. I know many who would not be without one myself included. A strong hook gets into places nothing else will.
It is the tool for carving wooden bowls and spoons, wooden instrument craftspeople do well with hooks and they have been used for aboriginal boat building across North America as a main finishing tool.
First, the steel. Tool steel bought from a supplier is perfectly annealed and easy to work with or one can recover steel. I recover mill bandsaw blade 30cm (12") wide x 76cm (30") or gang saw which is 45cm (18") diameter x 2.5mm (1/8") because of its tensile qualities and strength. It is a Swedish steel with a combination of molybdenum, chromium, nickel as well as a high carbon content. When filers (a mill working trade) toss band saw out they cut them up into 10cm (4") or 12.5 ( 5") lengths. If you can get some it is well worth using for knife blades especially for hooks because of its exceptional tensile strength which lends itself to an excellent edge.
I was taught the harder but thorough way; filing for shape and hardening and tempering my own blades. Some grinding speeds up the process but one has to be very careful not to burn the steel. The most important factor in making any knife with reclaimed steel if your putting your own hardness and temper into it is the annealing process.

To make a hook of medium size using sawblade (with any hard high carbon steel the process is the same) cut two pieces of steel 2cm (¾") x 2.5mm (1/8") x 15cm ( 6"). Bring the two lengths of steel to a cherry red, not letting it get any hotter or you'll damage the steel, slowly over 5 or 6 minutes and let it sit at that colour for at least 10 minutes (20 is ideal). Place the cherry red steel into a large coffee can with a lid filled with wood ash, slated lime or wrap the steel with ceramic wool, insulation that completely envelopes the cherry red steel. Let it cool slowly overnight. In the morning you should be able to bend the steel with your fingers.
Annealing relaxes the carbon molecules It can now be filed, drilled, sanded and bent... With this practice you can start from scratch putting your own shape, hardness, temper, strength and marks into the steel.
Now you have a piece 2.5mm (1/8") x 2cm (¾") x 15cm (6") long and annealed. Whatever size of blade, it should have the same proportions as above. If, for instance, it is 1.25mm (1/16") steel, it will be half the length and width of blade as the 2.5mm (1/8"). The handle end (the tang) should not be less than 5cm (2") long. With this idea you can build very small, 1.25mm (1/16") hooks, 2.5cm (1") long, beautiful for detail. Smaller hooks require a slightly different process. Dedicate the nicest side, the side with no nicks or scratches, as the back. Then designate one end as the tip end. Draw a line across the middle of the blade. Now there is a back and top and 7.5cm (3") of tang and 7.5cm (3") of blade. Now draw a line lengthwise right down the centre of the blade, from end to end. The two lines will cross in the centre of the blade. On the tang, 2.5cm (1") down from the centre cross line, mark your first bolt hole on the length line, then mark a hole point 1.25cm (½") from the end of the tang, on the centre length line. From the tip end, draw 2 lines, one on either side of the end to end centre line, creating an isoscele triangle to the cross centre line. On the equal sides of the triangle, draw slow curves, using the lines as guides, for the cutting edges Now grind to the curved lines. Keep the steel cool dipping it into a can of water as the steel heats up.




Part 2 Setting and putting a double bevel on your hook blade.
A roughed out, annealed blade, holes drilled, medium sized hook blade or a hook blade relative to this size. Set the tang into a handle now so that working on the blade will be easier. Cut a block of hardwood 3.75cm (1 ½") x 4.5cm (1 ¾") x 28cm (11"). Cherry or yew is my preference for tool handles.
This will end up being a well balanced handle capable of fitting one and two hands comfortably. On a 4.5cm (1 ¾") side and on one end, mark off 2cm (¾"). From there draw a line at 15 degrees, taking off the corner (see picture). Make sure the new surface is flat and true. File the sides of the blade tangs so they're true. Place your blade on the new surface face down, the tang centred and 2.5mm ( 1/8") below the cross line. Outline the tang tight with a sharp pencil. Carve the tang into the block so that the tang is sunk 1.25mm (1/16") below the surface of the block. You want it to be a perfect fit with depth forgivness for later when youā€™ll finish the handle. Mark your holes through the tang onto the wood. Drill 2.5cm (1/8") diameter holes straight through the block. Place your tang into the block. Slip in two 3.75cm (1 ½"), #6 stainless bolts and snug the blade and handle together with square nuts to make sure it fits.
You can shape the block into a handle using these pictures as a guide after the blade is finished and ready to mount but you want this point of completion for the shaping process.
This style of hook knife is strong. It is a double bevelled straight knife with a sturdy hook. The annealed roughed out blade for the hook knife is now ready for the edges to be put on. Putting a double bevel on the blade will be making a mirror image of itself. This technique and the one to follow, in part 5, depends on how well the steel is annealed. Put the blade in a vise securely with the top up. Draw a line down the blade centre and across, mirroring the lines on the back. You'll need files: a coarse bastard to a fine mill. File strokes are important. The idea is to file an edge bevelled to the centre line, from the tip of the blade to the cross line. To leave the blade with a gentle curve up and off ¾" of the way along, gently drop the outside end of the file and lift up and off for the last 1/4 to the cross line.

There should end up being filed cutting edges on both sides of the centre line (mirroring each other) ¾" of the way down the blade, then a curve off at the cross line for the t ¼". You might want to draw some secondary lines. Take a look at the picture. Then repeat the technique with a gradation of files. Use a series of six 2.5cm (1") x 3.75cm (1 1/2")x 30.5cm (12") sticks, each squared on a sander for good corners. I wrap each with a sheet of no-fill sandpaper starting with 100 grit to 1000. Wrap the sheets tight and staple on an edge. Staple two ends and the middle. Using the sanding sticks like files, finish the blade. When that is complete, sharpen the bevelled side edges only (top side) on a stone. Sharpen the blade to a razor edge, just taking the burr off the back. Donā€™t worry about the wire edge, not until it is hardened.

http://www.caribooblades.com

Last edited by Scott; 12-11-2006 at 07:57 PM. Reason: Full Tutorial
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-13-2006, 05:44 AM
squbrigg's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Miramichi, NB, Canada
Posts: 5,837
Thanks: 6
Thanked 45 Times in 32 Posts
Send a message via MSN to squbrigg
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

Now that takes patience. Nice work. I appreciate the effort that goes into well made and designed tools. Nice to see the art of hand tool making is alive and well and living on the West Coast. Must be something in the air out there, Rick Ferry in Seattle is a master at the craft as well.

Bob
__________________
Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, I'd like to pipe: "Up Spirits" or "Splice the Main Brace" .....................one more time.


link to Gallery photos
http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.co...user/2823/sl/s
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-13-2006, 11:43 AM
whitecree's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: northwest BC
Posts: 1,144
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

I knew quite a bit of that already, but it was a nice refresher. Dunking the red hot metal in lime is new to me, I'm going to have to try that.

Loved your website, and bookmarked it! I've been wanting a gutter adze for awhile now and the one on your 'site looks about the right size. Hmmmm, maybe on payday...
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-07-2006, 12:32 AM
justanick's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: I live in Washington state, in the tri-city area. It is about 5 hr drive to Seattle
Posts: 123
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

Hi Scott. Thanks for posting this info. I do have some questions though. How do you sharpen the blade? Do you sharpen before bending or after,And how do you bend the blade? Do you use some tyoe of form? I would really like to know more about this process. Thank you.
__________________
live as though it is your last dayCheers
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-07-2006, 10:51 AM
Hi_Ho_Sliver's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Arizona
Posts: 11,127
Thanks: 1
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

some good looking knives!Ice Cream
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-07-2006, 11:24 AM
whitecree's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: northwest BC
Posts: 1,144
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

I'd like to hear if Scott sharpens before or after bending as well. I make most of my own knives, and I usually do most of the sharpening before bending, mostly because sharpening after bending can be a pain.

But since Scott is in the business, maybe he knows something I don't...
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-07-2006, 11:45 AM
Hi_Ho_Sliver's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Arizona
Posts: 11,127
Thanks: 1
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

have you ever made one of those knives but not bent it? would make a great straight carving knife I think? Also another product for you to sell?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-21-2006, 11:42 PM
justanick's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: I live in Washington state, in the tri-city area. It is about 5 hr drive to Seattle
Posts: 123
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

Thanks for posting this information. As soon as I can get my hand on the materials I will tryu to make one of these knives.
__________________
live as though it is your last dayCheers
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-22-2006, 11:35 AM
Hi_Ho_Sliver's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Arizona
Posts: 11,127
Thanks: 1
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

Those are great looking knives Scott! Need someone to test one for you ? LOL Bouncing S
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-22-2006, 11:36 AM
Hi_Ho_Sliver's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Arizona
Posts: 11,127
Thanks: 1
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Default Re: making hook or bent knives Haida style.

This is another post that needs to go into the new "Tutorials" thread, but I am embarrassed to say, I don't remember how to move them?Sad
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hook Knives vs. Hardwood dragger Woodcarving Tools, Technology & Sharpening 6 07-05-2012 09:41 PM
Haida-style mask - WIP pallin New Projects and Works in Progress (WIP) 20 04-24-2011 01:38 PM
Crooked and Hook Knives Video woodsroamer Woodcarving Tools, Technology & Sharpening 2 01-09-2011 07:58 PM
Swedish style engraving knives GILLY Woodcarving Tools, Technology & Sharpening 22 02-06-2006 01:59 PM
Substitute for expensive "bent knives" AlArchie Woodcarving Tools, Technology & Sharpening 2 02-08-2003 09:47 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:46 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2010 Fox Chapel Publishing Co., Woodcarving Illustrated

SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2