Welcome to the Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board, an online wood carving forum community where you can join thousands of carvers from around the world discussing all things related to carving. To gain full access to the message board you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:
  • Browse over 90,000 posts.
  • Communicate privately with other carvers from around the world.
  • Post your own photos or view from 3,500 user submitted images.
  • Gain access to exclusive wood carving promotions offered by Wood Carving Illustrated and Fox Chapel Publishing.
All this and much more is available to you absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact the Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board's Support Team.

Go Back   Woodcarving Illustrated Message Board > Members and Magazines > Welcome Members
Connect with Facebook

American Science & Surplus
Welcome Members

Reply
Share Thread:
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-16-2010, 05:59 PM
Inadv's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Murphy, NC
Posts: 805
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via MSN to Inadv
Default Greetings

Greetings Everyone,

Since everytime I google a question about wood carving, The Woodcarving Illustrated forum pops in at the first page, and since you folks always seem to have the best answers and advice, it's time for me to be a subscriber. So as time goes on you can expect to see me here.

Also while I'm introducing, I'd like to ask my first two questions. Does anyone here also carve in soapstone or slightly harder materials such as catlinite and steatite? If so could anyone recommed a good knife for soapstone? As I'm really quite new to wood carving, though I've whittled sticks since boyhood, I'm interested in carving some relatively green (found) wood. Can anyone in WNC recommend good species for this purpose and or sealers to prevent splitting after the piece is carved from aging (drying).

Thanks!
__________________
Mitakuye Oyasin,

Inadv


Rule 1: Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.
- Mark Twain
Rule 2: There's no present. There's only the immediate future and the recent past.
- George Carlin
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-16-2010, 08:51 PM
Inadv's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Murphy, NC
Posts: 805
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via MSN to Inadv
Default Opps

Greetings Everyone,

Sorry folks... Didn't know there was a seperate forum for newbies here, and I originally posted to the General Carving forum. Been reading posts since then, and will likely spend a goodly few more evenings trying to get some pointers, and I always do from folks who carve remarkably beautiful work and are very knowledgeable in their craft.

Since everytime I google a question about wood carving, The Woodcarving Illustrated forum pops in at the first page, and since you folks always seem to have the best answers and advice, it's time for me to be a subscriber. So as time goes on you can expect to see me here.

Also while I'm introducing myself, I'd like to ask my first two questions. Does anyone here also carve in soapstone or slightly harder materials such as catlinite and steatite? If so could anyone recommed a good knife for soapstone? As I'm really quite new to wood carving, though I've whittled sticks since boyhood, I'm interested in carving some relatively green (found) wood. Can anyone in WNC recommend good species for this purpose and or sealers to prevent splitting after the piece is carved from aging (drying).

Thanks!
__________________

__________________
Mitakuye Oyasin,

Inadv


Rule 1: Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.
- Mark Twain
Rule 2: There's no present. There's only the immediate future and the recent past.
- George Carlin
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-16-2010, 09:27 PM
Donna_T's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Nevada, Missouri (Southwest MO)
Posts: 2,600
Thanks: 25
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Default Re: Greetings

Welcome to the message board. It's the go-to place for all kinds of carving information and help.

I've not tried carving soapstone, but I have carved green northern white pine. That's the only fresh, green wood I've tried. It was a fairly small piece--about 3-4" thick and 8" or so tall. I had no problem with it curing and splitting. It took me several days to complete it and I just kept it in a bucket of water each night to keep it wet. Once I finished it and got it painted, I just sealed it lightly with a Krylon matt spray. It was an interesting experience because I usually only carve dry, cured wood.

Donna_T
__________________
Donna Thomas has been carving in SW Missouri since 1988...
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-16-2010, 09:36 PM
bigEd_H's Avatar
Expert chip maker
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Lakewood, WA USA
Posts: 2,311
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Opps

Hi Inadv, welcome to the forum. Nice to have you join us. I can't help you with carving soapstone. That sounds interesting, though.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-16-2010, 09:55 PM
Mitchell's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Morganton NC
Posts: 3,101
Thanks: 4
Thanked 37 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Opps

Pentacryl (Sp?) will keep green wood from splitting as it drys to some degree. There have been some posts about it in the past.

I'll try to find one or two.

Here's one: How to deal with fresh cherry logs

BTW - I combined the two threads.
__________________
My WCI gallery
CCA Website Caricature Carvers of America

Last edited by Mitchell; 01-16-2010 at 11:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-16-2010, 10:20 PM
squbrigg's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Miramichi, NB, Canada
Posts: 5,865
Thanks: 7
Thanked 55 Times in 41 Posts
Send a message via MSN to squbrigg
Default Re: Greetings

Soapstone will be too hard for edged tools, but does great with power. If you want to carve it the old fashion way, use files and lots of elbow grease. Most stone carvers use power now a day, soapstone being the traditional material of our Inuit People in the North. A couple of good friends of mine carve it, better them than me .... too darn hard and dusty, I'd rather be making wood chips.

Bob
__________________
Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, I'd like to pipe: "Up Spirits" or "Splice the Main Brace" .....................one more time.


link to Gallery photos
http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.co...user/2823/sl/s
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-17-2010, 12:07 AM
Inadv's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Murphy, NC
Posts: 805
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via MSN to Inadv
Default Re: Greetings

Thanks to everyone who has responded thus far. I am currently using a Proxxon rotary tool and wood rasps on the stone carving, particularly the harder ones (catlinite and steatite). Both materials by the way are being made into Native American styled pipes. The soapstone I am currently sculpting and is much softer than the others, but takes detail fairly nicely, and hence my desire to use a knife in some places where burs don't quite fit in. Looks like some needle rasps are in my near future, so guess I'd better stock up on the elbow grease too.

Thanks for the tips so far on the green wood too. I see a lot of folks on the forums using found wood, but it appears most have dried it to some extent. I am going to cut and work a some of the green stuff this later in the spring, and later in the summer when I visit home folks down in SE Georgia. I know there is some beautiful red-hearted maple, cypress knees, and red cedar in my old stomping grounds down there. But I don't know much about the stuff here in Western North Carolina. There's a good bit of poplar white pine, sassafras, hemlock, buckeye, and oak around where I live, and I have a feeling there are some other really good species that would be particularly good for carving.

Thanks again to everyone!
__________________
Mitakuye Oyasin,

Inadv


Rule 1: Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.
- Mark Twain
Rule 2: There's no present. There's only the immediate future and the recent past.
- George Carlin
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-17-2010, 02:31 PM
Riverman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Adamsville, Tn
Posts: 3,835
Thanks: 24
Thanked 52 Times in 52 Posts
Default Re: Greetings

Hi Inadv, welcome to the group!
Bob
__________________
A daily dose of laughter relieves stress and brightens our mental outlook.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-17-2010, 02:35 PM
Mark Dellinger's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 5,595
Thanks: 69
Thanked 94 Times in 88 Posts
Default Re: Greetings

Welcome and good to have you with us.

Safe Craving and God Bless,

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-17-2010, 06:40 PM
Inadv's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Murphy, NC
Posts: 805
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via MSN to Inadv
Default Re: Update

Hello people,

Just thought I'd give a quick update the green wood questions. The weather got kind of nice today and I was finally able to drive out of our nearly vertical 200yd long driveway. We live on the north base of Cold Mountain (yes, the same one featured in a recent movie of some proclaim), and the 18" of swnow we got a few days before Christmas is, at long last, nearly gone now. Good riddance!

A seemingly brilliant idea (aren't they all brilliant in the beginning?) of cutting a few saplings for walking sticks while the sap was down in the dead of winter might be an advantage. Quess what? The sap doesn't go down on white pine around here. I brought a small piece from re-sizing one of the staves inside, and the sap is nearly dripping out of it. Maybe I picked a bad moon-time, but more likely as cold as it seems there is insufficient chill to bring the sap down on this tree in this place. I went ahead and shaved off a spot to get it down to wood, and will let this dry until it is carveable without gumming up the works. My plan is to carve it while soft and then encapsulate it with a sealer when finished.

So then my question for today is... Can someone recommend the best product, or if there even is one that will stop the drying process completely?

Thanks again for your help. I hate trial and error when or if it can be avoided, and you folks have the accumulated talent and experience. The beautiful part of it all is your willingness to share it within this community. I am grateful.
__________________
Mitakuye Oyasin,

Inadv


Rule 1: Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.
- Mark Twain
Rule 2: There's no present. There's only the immediate future and the recent past.
- George Carlin
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:21 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2000 - 2010 Fox Chapel Publishing Co., Woodcarving Illustrated

SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2